#Epub õ Melmoth the Wanderer » eBook or E-pub free

There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. #Epub ⚝ Melmoth the Wanderer Ø This Work Has Been Selected By Scholars As Being Culturally Important, And Is Part Of The Knowledge Base Of Civilization As We Know It This Work Was Reproduced From The Original Artifact, And Remains As True To The Original Work As Possible Therefore, You Will See The Original Copyright References, Library Stamps As Most Of These Works Have Been Housed In Our Most Important Libraries Around The World , And Other Notations In The Work This Work Is In The Public Domain In The United States Of America, And Possibly Other Nations Within The United States, You May Freely Copy And Distribute This Work, As No Entity Individual Or Corporate Has A Copyright On The Body Of The WorkAs A Reproduction Of A Historical Artifact, This Work May Contain Missing Or Blurred Pages, Poor Pictures, Errant Marks, Etc Scholars Believe, And We Concur, That This Work Is Important Enough To Be Preserved, Reproduced, And Made Generally Available To The Public We Appreciate Your Support Of The Preservation Process, And Thank You For Being An Important Part Of Keeping This Knowledge Alive And Relevant There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again. There s an old story told by Ezra Pound I believe it can be found either in The ABC of Reading or From Confucius to Cummings about a retired sea captain, determined to improve his primary school Latin, who was tasked by his tutor the local vicar or schoolmaster with reading Vergil s Aeneid When he had finished, his mentor inquired, How did you like the hero Hero What hero the captain replied Why, it s Aeneus I mean, answered the teacher Hero You call him a hero By God, I thought he was a priest That s how I feel about the hero Melmoth He s supposed to have sold his soul to the devil in exchange for two hundred years of life, but he s so incompetent that he never comes close to leading his would be substitutes to damnation instead, he whines about the inferior living to which he has been assigned by his demonic superiors, just like a dissatisfied curate Dissatisfied curate is a phrase that aptly describes Charles Maturin, the author of Melmoth the Wanderer An impoverished, married clergyman, he was convinced that his failure to rise was a consequence of his theological convictions, but it appears that he waslikely snubbed because of his refusal to play politics or follow instructions I believe, however, that it might very well have been theological rigidity that made it impossible for Maturin to create a thoughtful and thrilling gothic fiction Although he admired the sensational effects of Monk Lewis, the sombre tableaux of Mary Shelly, and the thoughtful meditations of William Godwin, Maturin s conventional moral limitations seem to have prevented him from learning useful literary lessons from any of them, and to have hampered him on every page of this extremely long this much, much too long novel.Maturin is willing to expound on any given insight or expand any given image far beyond intellectual elucidation or sensuous delight Whether it be a philosophical disquisition, a theological dispute, a sepulchral or an Edenic description, the reader may be sure that, although it may amaze by being exhaustive, it will never please by being succinct The only exception is Maturin s extraordinary gift for vituperation Here, Melmoth speaks as eloquently as Shakespeare s Timon His Juvenalian rants are impressive in their completeness and terrifying in their energy, but alas they too eventually grow repetitive and wearisome I would be surprised if any admirer of Melmoth the Wanderer wished the book longer.There is, however, much in this book to respect, though it liesin the conception than in the execution Its Chinese box structure with tales within tales breaking off and resuming in surprising places, the damaged manuscripts marred with lucunae not only evoke The Arabian Nights but also serve to help the reader suspend his disbelief and appreciate the unfolding narrative in a distinctly post modernist fashion The glimpses of rural Ireland and its people are distinctly observed and well executed, reminding one of the better pages of Walter Scott Also, the conception of Melmoth himself a monstrous meld of Byron, Faust and Satan, a creature both human and inhuman, inside and outside of time is despite the clerical prissiness inherited from his spiritual father Maturin a thoroughly original and influential creation Listen closely to Melmoth s conversation with the unspoiled Immalee and you may hear the voices of Lord Rochester and Jane Eyre I was also pleasantly surprised by the ending, in which all the tales rush precipitously to a powerful conclusion with all the energy and abruptness of Monk Lewis Maturin wanted to stretch the novel out to five volumes, but his publisher, having had enough, refused All in all, I am glad I read the novel I am even happier that I read it quickly I am sure I shall never read it again.